Jayne Mansfield on the set of Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957)

Jayne Mansfield on the set of Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957)

(Source: laurasaxby)

(Source: manythewonders)


"My baby (Jayne Marie Mansfield) is the most precious thing of all. She’s adorable. If I ever marry again, I’d like five more children. When will I marry again? At this moment, I don’t know…When I do marry, it will be to someone mature, a man who loves sport and outdoor life, but who is just as much at home in a night club or by the fireside." - Jayne Mansfield, Picturegoer Magazine December 8, 1956. 
This quote was said about two years before her marriage to Mickey Hargitay (although they were already dating at this point). Jayne never did have five more children like she wanted, but she did have four more, so she was close.

"My baby (Jayne Marie Mansfield) is the most precious thing of all. She’s adorable. If I ever marry again, I’d like five more children. When will I marry again? At this moment, I don’t know…When I do marry, it will be to someone mature, a man who loves sport and outdoor life, but who is just as much at home in a night club or by the fireside." - Jayne Mansfield, Picturegoer Magazine December 8, 1956. 

This quote was said about two years before her marriage to Mickey Hargitay (although they were already dating at this point). Jayne never did have five more children like she wanted, but she did have four more, so she was close.


"The actress and singer Jayne Mansfield (born Vera Jayne Palmer on April 19, 1933) was one of those quintessentially American pop-culture creations who helped define the country’s mood — playful, naive, and expansive — in the middle part of the 20th century. That she was also, in large part, a self-created icon who reveled in publicity stunts only added, and still adds today, to her appeal; it’s difficult, after all, to dislike someone who so giddily pursues fame, and who so exuberantly embraces it once it’s attained" - LIFE

"The actress and singer Jayne Mansfield (born Vera Jayne Palmer on April 19, 1933) was one of those quintessentially American pop-culture creations who helped define the country’s mood — playful, naive, and expansive — in the middle part of the 20th century. That she was also, in large part, a self-created icon who reveled in publicity stunts only added, and still adds today, to her appeal; it’s difficult, after all, to dislike someone who so giddily pursues fame, and who so exuberantly embraces it once it’s attained" - LIFE


"I told them that I wanted to be an actress and that I looked like an Indian. They wrote me a nice letter, but said that unfortunately, among all those Indians the camera would have a hard time convincing them I was real." - Jayne Mansfield on her early career aspirations.
As strange as it may sound, Jayne actually originally wanted to become an actress that play ethnic parts (i.e Native American)
Credit to jaynemansfield.org for the quote!

"I told them that I wanted to be an actress and that I looked like an Indian. They wrote me a nice letter, but said that unfortunately, among all those Indians the camera would have a hard time convincing them I was real." - Jayne Mansfield on her early career aspirations.

As strange as it may sound, Jayne actually originally wanted to become an actress that play ethnic parts (i.e Native American)

Credit to jaynemansfield.org for the quote!

tracesofthevanished:

The Trouble with Angels (Ida Lupino, 1966)

pinkbubblegum3:

Jayne Mansfield ♥

pinkbubblegum3:

Jayne Mansfield ♥

jasmineloren:

baby jayne

jasmineloren:

baby jayne

foreveroldhollywood:

Interviewer: That famous photo of you staring at Jayne Mansfield’s chest — what were you thinking?
Loren: I was very much afraid her breast was going to come out completely! It was fear!

foreveroldhollywood:

Interviewer: That famous photo of you staring at Jayne Mansfield’s chest — what were you thinking?

Loren: I was very much afraid her breast was going to come out completely! It was fear!

fawnvelveteen:

Portrait of Jayne Mansfield for The Girl Can’t Help It directed by Frank Tashlin, 1956

fawnvelveteen:

Portrait of Jayne Mansfield for The Girl Can’t Help It directed by Frank Tashlin, 1956